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Sunday, July 31, 2016

Garbage Jelly?

Recently I tried my hand at making fried corn for the first time ever.  I guess I am a purist and am so partial to corn on the cob I never tried fresh corn  any other way.  After I had cut all the kernels and scrapped the cobs I looked online to make sure I remembered correctly how to cook it. (The guy who grew it had given me pretty specific instructions but it was about 45 minutes from home and I had seen all kinds of shiny diversions between the lake and home, so I really didn't trust my memory) As it turned out, I had remembered after all, so instead of just starting to cook the corn I followed a link to Corn Cob Jelly?!? I had never heard of such before, so of course I had to try it because it is weird and  I had everything on hand to make it plus, did I mention, it was weird. "Nuff said!

This was so incredibly simple that I saved some of the cobs from the bushel I just processed for the freezer and have juice (Is there actually such a thing as corn juice?) frozen to make more after the weekend.

                                                              Corn Cob Jelly




6 or more corn cobs
Water to cover them (About a half gallon maybe)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 box powdered full sugar pectin
Sugar to equal the final amount of corn juice

Cover the cobs with water and cook on a low boil until the water smells corny and has a soft yellow hue. (I actually put a spoon in to taste it and it tasted like corn water) Remove the cobs and bring the heat up to a full rolling boil  and reduce it until you have about 3 1/2 cups of liquid.  Remove from the heat, strain the liquid to remove any random buts and pieces, measure the it and return it to a large pot. (if you have under 3 1/2 cups add a little more water to bring to liquid up to that measure)  Add the lemon juice and the pectin to the corn water and bring it to a boil. Add the sugar (an equal amount to the liquid you have) and stir to dissolve.  Bring it back to a rolling boil and keep it there for 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Skim off the foam, turn the heat off and ladle the liquid into sterile canning jars.  I am not going to go through the process of preparing jars, lids and rings and water bath caning. You can find all those instructions right here. Seal the lids finger tight and process for 10 minutes in a water bath. Remove the jars from the canner and place them on an absorbent towel somewhere that they can sit undisturbed for about 24 hours.  After several hours check to make sure all the jars have sealed. (Listen for the wonderful "ping") If they did not seal properly, process in the water bath again.  I used four 1/2 pint jars because we do not use a lot of jelly at one time and I prefer to make small batches so jars are not stored opened too long.  It is entirely up to you to decide what size you want.

I read that this tastes like honey and I do get a faint honey taste.  It is mainly just really tasty jelly and every person who has visited me this week has been subject to the taste test.  Thus far it has passed with flying colors. (See above about making more) .

 Guess who is making Christmas presents a few people on my list have surely never had before?  Now I just have to find me some more weird ass jelly recipes and I can make jelly gift baskets!

20 comments:

  1. Oooh. How pretty, and tasting good too is definitelya a bonus. I had never heard of corn jelly. What would you serve it with?

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    1. I think on toast or over cream cheese with crackers

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  2. I had heard of corn cob jelly and intended to make some. I am glad to hear someone I know has made it and liked it. It's very pretty, so delicate.

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    1. It is pretty and that is the color that occurred naturally

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  3. I have heard of corn cob jelly, but never tasted it. I think I've seen it in larger jars with the cob displayed in the middle. We don't eat a lot of jelly, so I don't know if I would make some or not. But it is very pretty and sounds easy to make. BTW, I had a book out of the library once that was all about gifting jellies and jams with recipes and presentation ideas. Can't remember the name of it, but you might try to find it.

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    1. We are not huge jelly eaters either, but I saw gift possibilities so I tried it, and will be making more this week. I will search for the book. Thanks for the heads up.

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  4. I have never heard of corn jelly, but it sounds very cool!

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  5. Ok then, on your word, must give this a go.

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  6. Very interesting! I've never heard of this! What do you put it on?

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    1. No idea, but I think I will make jelly filled muffins with it.

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  7. I have never heard of this before. It is a good idea though. I love hearing about using something that I thought was waste/scraps and turning it into something yummy.

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    1. If I weren't so easily distracted I would never have even seen it. I was not so much about using waste as I was trying something weird

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  8. How about Tropical Mango Rum Fig Preserves?

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  9. How interesting!!! I would love to try some of that!!

    Tania

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  10. I've never heard of fried corn, no less corn cob jelly. Congratulations on trying new recipes.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. I am just about always game to try something new.

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