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Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Different Corn

How is it possible for corn to be unusual! I mean it's corn! And corn is about as plain and simple a food as you can get right? Well tonight I was using a bag of corn niblets I had frozen and just was not in the mood for traditional corn. So I did a Google search using the keywords unusual corn and came up with this recipe from All Recipes.  For once I made it mostly by the recipe except for a few changes, one intentional and one accidental and one just because I like to be a little different occasionally.

For the sake of all that is holy when recipe sharing I am writing it as written. I will put my changes in parenthesis

                                                               Cajun Corn


            (I have no idea if this is a cajun standard or not.  I have been to Louisiana many time and have              never eaten it or seen it on a menu, at least that I remember)

6 ears corn, husked, cleaned  and scraped (2 1/2 cups frozen corn niblets)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (Wasn't wearing glasses, used 1 tablespoon sesame seed oil then 1                                                           tablespoon olive oil. Oops, but the flavor was good!)
1 large onion, thinly sliced
1 cup green bell pepper, chopped (I used 1 1/2)
1  large fresh tomato, chopped ( 2 large tomatoes because they both needed to be used right then)
1/4 cup milk (I omitted this because it sounded weird. Next time I will add heavy cream instead)
salt to taste
cayenne pepper to taste ( The plastic shaker top came off, so I probably accidentally                                                                    dumped a tablespoon into the corn. Hot! )
(couple of dashes of red pepper flakes) Not sure why I added this, habit I guess
1/4 cup chopped green onions
8 strips crisply cooked bacon, crumbled
(sour cream) it was so blooming hot we had to have something to temper the heat

In a large saute' pan, heat the oil  and add the onions and peppers.  Cook until wilted but not browned. Throw in the corn (if using fresh off the cob corn scrape the cob for the "milk" and toss it in too. Add the milk (I used water because milk sounded weird to me.  Next time I am going to use heavy cream. You need a bit of dairy to temper the heat.) Add the spices and cook until the corn is tender.  Serve on plates and top with the green onions, tomatoes and bacon.  You will see in the picture there is no sour cream, mainly because I had not taken a bite of it and realized how hot it was. I immediately put about a tablespoon of sour cream on mine to fight the malingering heat inside my mouth. It did the trick for me, but TheHub couldn't eat his. He thought the flavor was great but it almost brought tears to his eyes.

I will make this again, but I will be very careful about the amount of cayenne I use. I guess I need to rethink my "measuring is for sissies" mantra.  This might be equally tasty without the hot stuff, at least for those who don't like their food to bite back a little.

My Beloved Sister shared this website with me and told me to post it on the blog.  I had never seen or heard of it before, but after playing with it a bit it has some serious potential for quick on the spot dinner planning. She has been using it regularly and swears by it! http://myfridgefood.com/






16 comments:

  1. Oh, this looks so good, but I can't eat onions, green peppers, or anything spicy. My stomach thanks me for obeying its rules. It's a good thing I'm happy to have corn on the cob with some butter.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Yes it is. My mouth is happy I have a cast iron gut!

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  2. It is amazing the lift that spices can give isn't it? Many years ago himself made a Malaccan Devil's curry which had forty chillis in it. It burned going down and it burned coming out. Tasted good, but...

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    1. I am biting my tongue to keep from posting what I really want to say here. But. . .
      Yes, and I love spicy foods too.

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  3. I'm surprised that you didn't try to scrape some of the cayenne out. I do that sometimes when I've made a mistake with the spices. It sort of works. But then again, you like your HOT, so you probably weren't worried about it. Anyway, anything with corn and tomatoes is good in my book.

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    1. About a tablespoon and a half fell out. I managed to get about a half a tablespoon before it drifted into everything but then it was too late to scoop. I would have just added more corn, but I had none. Oh well!

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  4. What a fun site...I can't wait to play around on it later today. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. It is fun. I played with it trying all sorts of weird ingredients.

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  5. Corn is on sale by me, thanks for the reminder. I would have forgotten. ;p
    I'm coming to eat at your house! So how did it go with sluggy? Was she a trouble maker? Feel free to tell her I said that. Ohhh, its like 3rd grade all over again.

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    1. Come anytime. I won't even make you eat Moon Pies. She is just delightful! I understand why everyone loves her.

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  6. The hotter the better as far as my daughter is concerned - I usually spice things to my taste then she adds more to hers. I find now whenever I eat something HOT I get the hiccups!!

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  7. OH too bad, unless your mouth really hates hot. I love food that bites back a little

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  8. maque choux, is what we call it in southwest Louisiana. You have inspired me to make that soon!

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    1. Glad to be inspiration and thanks for the real name!

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  9. I can feel the heat in my blood stream, eyes, and ears. Hot does not like me at all. I do make cayenne pepper jelly that I eat with wheat crackers and lots of cream cheese.

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    1. Cream cheese and hot pepper jelly! Yum! I like things hot but not eye watering hot and this was almost that hot.

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