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Thursday, September 5, 2019

Just For Fun

There are stereotypes about the South, some are over exaggerated and some are spot on. This is the story of one of those truths. Watch and learn!


26 comments:

  1. A friend sent me that clip a few days ago - and I hooted with mirth. Said friend also admitted to adding sugar to her cornbread.

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    1. Sugar in cornbread is a blasphemy! My grandmother would be rolling in her grave if I ever put it in mine!

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    2. Yes!! Sugar does NOT belong in cornbread!!!!!!!

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    3. Spoken like someone who understands the subtleties of cornbread

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  2. Not only don't I have a cast iron skillet any more (I had one, but it got tossed out), but I also put sugar in my cornbread! I follow the recipe on the box of yellow cornmeal I buy. :)

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    1. Bless I am just going to have to like you in spite of your cornbread transgressions. I am assuming you are not using Martha White cornmeal. They would never suggest something as evil as sugar!

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  3. I heard tales about those cast iron skillets. Actually, that would be a crime up here as well!

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    1. I think the sugar in the cornbread is a worse crime than the skillet. You can always re-season cast iron, but. . .

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  4. In Turkey, cornbread is a thing of the North actually. It is salty and hard. I prefer the softer and sweeter American version. Just did not know it was a crime. Lol! I tried frying okra couple of weeks ago and it was not a success. Any tips on that will be appreciated.

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    1. Wash and slice the okra horizontally in about 1/2 inch slices. Dredge in corn meal. I put about 1/4 cup oil (and a tablespoon bacon fat for taste) in an iron skillet and let it get hot enough that a drop of water will sizzle.(about medium high heat) Add the okra in a single layer covering the bottom of the pan (I have a really big skillet) After a couple of minutes turn the heat to medium, The important thing is to only turn it once midway through cooking. Remove from the pan and drain on absorbent toweling. Sprinkle with a little salt and serve piping hot. My cornbread is soft but it is definitely not sweet.

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  5. Ha! Funny video! I love cast iron skillets, mine has to be over 50 years old, and has never seen the inside of a dishwasher. Cornbread with sugar, no way! I just wish I had a Southern card...

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    1. I guess my Southern card is active, but then I was born and raised in the deep south, still say yes ma'am to my mother, call all of her friends Mrs. Whatevertheirlastnameis, eat pimmina (pimento) cheese sandwiches, and only use Dukes mayo.

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  6. The urban south is its own world.

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    1. I have found through traveling most places have their own unique customs and traditions. Southern ones are just more pronounced because the pace is slower.

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  7. This is really funny. I have my grandmother's iron skillet and it is seasoned perfectly because no one has ever dared to put it in the dishwasher. Also, I have heard my mother talk about sweet cornbread just like the girl in the video. Thanks for posting this.

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  8. We'll I own Five cast iron skillet plus a corn fritter cast iron pan. I think the youngest one is from 1983. I confess that my momma sugared her cornbread and drank buttermilk with it so I sugar mine a tiny bit(but say no to drinking buttermilk with it).

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    1. My dad did the buttermilk thing too. It stopped with him fortunately!

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  9. We have several cast iron skillets too! Every time I see the kids "helping" they leave it soaking in water because their eggs stuck. if they took care of it like I do, that wouldn't happen...

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  10. I had abut 20 cast iron skillets and two Dutch ovens before thieves helped themselves. I used six and the others were to give away or sell. No sugar in my cornbread or cornbread in buttermilk. Most f them were over 60 years old and Lodge. was an antique Griswold, One was brand new and had not been seasoned. I am quite sure I have a Southern card.

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  11. Fun video! We have a couple of cast iron skillets that Mrs KR inherited from her grandmother -- they're over 100 years old. But at some time someone either put on in the dishwasher or did something really awful to it -- it was really rusted when we got it. Took a LOT of loving care to restore its patina.

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    1. There used to be a guy in town who would re-season neglected cast iron. He would wait until he had several then make a huge fire in his backyard, coat them with shortening and let it go. I understand he did it about 10 times before they were perfect again. Like you said, lots of loving!

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